A Travellerspoint blog

WWOOFing in Wadi Rum

Logistics

So, here's the setup where I'm living at the moment. The family I'm living with lives in Rum Village, at the edge of Wadi Rum desert. Attached to the house is the tour office. Behind the house is the hostel, used mainly by rock climbers and us work exchange people. Then, 12km out in the desert, there is the bedouin camp.

DSC00975.jpg

So, tourists will book someting like a jeep tour and then a night camping in the bedouin tents out there. Maybe a camel ride back - yep, I did it. 12 km and blisters in interesting places.

The cast:
The family - Mohammed, his wife, and nine children. Whew! We spend some time speaking english with the kids.

DSC00976.jpg

The work exchange peeps - there are currently four of us. One, Sarah, has been gone since the day after I arrived, so I haven't gotten to know her. The other two, Stephanie & Bailey (Stephanie's 15 y/o daughter), are perfect. They're from the east coast, USA. They're totally sharp and laid back. Like me : ) They've already been here for two months and will be staying another two.

The employees - The camp employs four drivers for jeep & camel tours and a cook up at camp. I don't know if it's a Bedouin thing or just luck, but these guys are eminently respectful and good natured. This is the first place I've been able to let my hair down (Ha!).

So, us work exchange girls can basically choose each day how we want to contribute. There's hostel cleaning, tour guiding, email responding, and camp cleanup. Also, there is always customer support up at camp. We're expected to get 2-4 hours in each day. So, today I did email. Yesterday I did tour-guiding. The tour guiding is really fun but, at the same time, I think it's actually the most valuable work because the drivers don't really speak english. Also, just being up there at camp to answer questions is really useful.

Then at the end of the day, we and the drivers generally stay at camp with the tourists. The cook there is EXCELLENT! Also, after dinner, we party (which, here, means dance to Middle Eastern music and drink a lot of over-sweetened tea). Good times.

Posted by jenofear 03:19 Archived in Jordan

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Comments

Pleasepleaseplease think about writing a book when you get home about this.

I've always been a little in awe of you, and you keep delivering reasons why. This blog, these pictures - all of it makes me so proud that I know you... I love you, dear Jen. -S.

by shemena

Hello! I have just signed up for the same Wwoofing program. I have a handful of questions, since you did the same location a few years ago. Would you mind sending me your e-mail address (as I can't seem to find it here) so I can ask you a few questions about your experience? Thank you! -Christine info[at]christinearmbruster[dot]com

by carmbruster

Hello Jen! Nice to met you. I'm Brazilian, and I was planning to stay in a Kibbutz for 2 months but my entrance in Israel was denied and now I'm "trapped" in Amman. Would you give me the contact of this place wher you stayed woofing in Wadi Rum. i have some urgency in your answer.
Best for you my dear and congratulations by the "wild spirit", hehe.

Rodrigo.

by didanasarabias

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint